New forensic science certificate offered at Surry CC


Staff Report



Forensic Science Instructor Denise Sizemore, right, discusses fingerprint analysis with student Bailey Johnson of Mount Airy in Surry Community College’s Crime Lab at The Elkin Center.


Submitted photo

DOBSON — A new forensic science certificate is being offered at Surry Community College that will allow law enforcement personnel to obtain an additional credential to be more marketable and knowledgeable.

“The Forensic Science certificate will train current police officers on how to better handle crime scenes and how to approach larger scenes,” said Denise Sizemore, forensic science instructor at Surry Community College. “They will also be able to better assist the SBI (State Bureau of Investigation) agents if needed.”

Six classes taken over a year earns students a Forensic Science certificate within the Criminal Justice Concentration (CJC). Three classes are taken in the fall, with the rest taken in the spring. The classes are typically offered in the afternoons Monday through Thursday.

The certificate includes the following classes: CJC 115 Crime Scene Photography, CJC 146 Trace Evidence, CJC 245 Friction Ridge Analysis, CJC 144 Crime Scene Processing, CJC 222 Criminalistics and CJC 246 Advanced Friction Ridge Analysis.

“The certificate can help law enforcement personnel go into other areas of law enforcement and also give them a better idea of how evidence is processed at the scene,” Sizemore said. “It would really be a good certificate for law officers, as well as EMS to take to understand and know how to preserve a crime scene.”

The classes are taught at The Elkin Center where Surry Community College has a state-of-the-art Forensic Science Laboratory. The program was previously called Latent Evidence, but has recently undergone a name change to Forensic Science. Students can also choose to obtain a degree in Forensic Science by taking more classes. Both the certificate and the degree are a part of the college’s Criminal Justice Technology program.

Not only does the program teach students how to handle and maintain a crime scene and its evidence, the graduates will be able to conduct criminal investigations and assist in their successful prosecution in a criminal court while exhibiting ethical and professional behavior and work standards.

Learn more about the program by going to www.surry.edu or contacting Sizemore via email at sizemoredm@surry.edu. Registration for the summer semester and fall semester classes is going on now. For more information, go to www.surry.edu or call 336-386-3264.

Forensic Science Instructor Denise Sizemore, right, discusses fingerprint analysis with student Bailey Johnson of Mount Airy in Surry Community College’s Crime Lab at The Elkin Center.
https://www.elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/web1_C1_FALL2017-HQPRINT_formatted.jpgForensic Science Instructor Denise Sizemore, right, discusses fingerprint analysis with student Bailey Johnson of Mount Airy in Surry Community College’s Crime Lab at The Elkin Center. Submitted photo

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