EHS students see favoritism differently


By Boone Beaver, Brett Beaver, Phillip Bell, Rafael Salas - For The Tribune



Noe Torriente explains his view on favoritism.


Photo courtesy of Elkin High School

Favoritism is often a problem in schools. Students can feel mistreated or downgraded when they are treated differently or see other students treated differently by their teacher.

Elkin High School freshman Noe Torriente said he has witnessed favoritism in school. “Yes, teachers’ kids don’t get in as much trouble.”

Torriente believes students are treated differently based on who their parents may be. He also mentioned that he feels like teachers have kept an extra eye on him because of his background. Other students have a different perspective on favoritism at school.

Freshman Emma Swaim, a child of an Elkin City Schools teacher, explained that being the child of a teacher has not caused her to be favored over others. As a matter of fact, she feels she may receive more criticism because her mother is a teacher at the elementary school, so she is held to a higher standard.

When witnessing favoritism in situations involving other students, Swaim said girls “are more likely to get favored than guys.”

Whenever it happens, favoring one student over another is often based on assumptions which may not be correct, and usually involves hurt feelings.

Whether it is a totally negative experience is up to the person experiencing it. Coach Cory Rycroft said students should use favoritism for “inspiration and perseverance.” Rycroft said a student feeling left out of praise should examine himself. “If you can’t motivate yourself, no one can.”

Rycroft encouraged students to stay strong even if they are treated differently. Many students may get down and start to feel badly about themselves when they are treated differently, and that may lead to acting out and more criticism.

Any school system would be a better place without favoritism, and it is important to work toward the equality students would like to see in their world.

Boone Beaver, Brett Beaver, Phillip Bell and Rafael Salas are English students at Elkin High School.

Noe Torriente explains his view on favoritism.
https://www.elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/web1_favoritism-formatted.jpgNoe Torriente explains his view on favoritism. Photo courtesy of Elkin High School

By Boone Beaver, Brett Beaver, Phillip Bell, Rafael Salas

For The Tribune

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