Mountain Valley Hospice Grief Camp helps youth process loss


By Beanie Taylor - beanietaylor@elkintribune.com



Kids at Mountain Valley Hospice & Palliative Care's Brighter Days Children’s Camp learn to process grief through art and other activities with assistance from hospice staff and volunteers who have been specially trained to work with youth.


Submitted photos

Kids at Mountain Valley Hospice & Palliative Care's Brighter Days Children’s Camp learn to process grief through art and other activities with assistance from hospice staff and volunteers who have been specially trained to work with youth.


Submitted photos

Children at Mountain Valley Hospice & Palliative Care’s Brighter Days Children’s Camp learn to process grief through art and other activities with assistance from hospice staff and volunteers who have been specially trained to work with youth.


Submitted photos

Kids at Mountain Valley Hospice & Palliative Care's Brighter Days Children’s Camp learn to process grief through art and other activities with assistance from hospice staff and volunteers who have been specially trained to work with youth.


Submitted photos

Jewel, the comfort dog, is just one part of the Brighter Days Children’s Camp through Mountain Valley Hospice & Palliative Care’s Kids Path program that helps young people learn to process the loss of a loved one or their own impending mortality in a safe productive way.


Submitted photos

It can be difficult for an adult to process loss, much less help a child through their grief. Mountain Valley Hospice & Palliative Care offers assistance with Brighter Days Children’s Camp.

Just one part of the Kids Path program available through Mountain Valley Hospice, the camp is free to young people ages 5 to 18 who have either experienced a recent loss or expect to soon.

“We facilitate grief camp for children to provide a healing environment where they can come together with other young people who have also experienced a loss,” said Stacie Adams, “so that they can see they are not alone, or so different from others.”

As a Kids Path counselor, Adams has been trained specifically to help children and teens process grief as have the other camp advisors which includes volunteers as well as staff.

“We provide activities and group support designed to give them information about the grief process and how to cope with painful emotions in a healthy way,” said Adams.

This is done through arts, crafts, music and games that teach kids it’s OK to laugh while grieving as well as help provide safe appropriate outlets for their emotion.

Grief camp also helps young people learn how to remember their loved ones in spite of the pain ending camp with a memorial service to help parents understand what their children have learned as well as provide an outlet for release.

“It helps in the healing process to share our stories and our pain,” said Adams.

Mountain Valley Hospice holds several grief camps in the summer throughout their service region, which includes Alleghany, Davie, Forsyth, Iredell and Stokes counties in North Carolina as well as Surry, Wilkes and Yadkin and nine counties in Virginia.

Grief camps are part of the Kids Path program which helps children not only process the loss of a loved one, but also helps kids avoid crisis as they learn to cope with their own mortality.

For more information on Kids Path and Brighter Days Children’s Camp, go to http://www.mtnvalleyhospice.org/brighter-days or call 336-789-2922.

Beanie Taylor can be reached through voice mail at 336-258-4058 or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/TBeanieTaylor.

Kids at Mountain Valley Hospice & Palliative Care’s Brighter Days Children’s Camp learn to process grief through art and other activities with assistance from hospice staff and volunteers who have been specially trained to work with youth.
https://www.elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/web1_Art-therapy-1.jpgKids at Mountain Valley Hospice & Palliative Care’s Brighter Days Children’s Camp learn to process grief through art and other activities with assistance from hospice staff and volunteers who have been specially trained to work with youth.Submitted photos

Kids at Mountain Valley Hospice & Palliative Care’s Brighter Days Children’s Camp learn to process grief through art and other activities with assistance from hospice staff and volunteers who have been specially trained to work with youth.
https://www.elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/web1_Art-therapy-2.jpgKids at Mountain Valley Hospice & Palliative Care’s Brighter Days Children’s Camp learn to process grief through art and other activities with assistance from hospice staff and volunteers who have been specially trained to work with youth.Submitted photos

Children at Mountain Valley Hospice & Palliative Care’s Brighter Days Children’s Camp learn to process grief through art and other activities with assistance from hospice staff and volunteers who have been specially trained to work with youth.
https://www.elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/web1_Brighter-Days-Dobson-campers-2.jpgChildren at Mountain Valley Hospice & Palliative Care’s Brighter Days Children’s Camp learn to process grief through art and other activities with assistance from hospice staff and volunteers who have been specially trained to work with youth. Submitted photos

Kids at Mountain Valley Hospice & Palliative Care’s Brighter Days Children’s Camp learn to process grief through art and other activities with assistance from hospice staff and volunteers who have been specially trained to work with youth.
https://www.elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/web1_IMG_1421.jpgKids at Mountain Valley Hospice & Palliative Care’s Brighter Days Children’s Camp learn to process grief through art and other activities with assistance from hospice staff and volunteers who have been specially trained to work with youth.Submitted photos

Jewel, the comfort dog, is just one part of the Brighter Days Children’s Camp through Mountain Valley Hospice & Palliative Care’s Kids Path program that helps young people learn to process the loss of a loved one or their own impending mortality in a safe productive way.
https://www.elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/web1_Jewel-the-Comfort-Dog-2.jpgJewel, the comfort dog, is just one part of the Brighter Days Children’s Camp through Mountain Valley Hospice & Palliative Care’s Kids Path program that helps young people learn to process the loss of a loved one or their own impending mortality in a safe productive way. Submitted photos

By Beanie Taylor

beanietaylor@elkintribune.com

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