Trump election threatens DACA repeal, frightens many students


By Erica Pineda, Cristina Nava, and Karla Romero - For The Tribune



Tre Turner, EHS student, votes last fall in mock election.


Cristina Nava | EHS

This past presidential election has been one of the most controversial for people all over the United States. Nick Tomlin, Elkin High School civics teacher, held a school-wide mock election last fall and described the results as “very close” to those of the actual election.

It is possible that many students voted according to their parents’ political views, which Tomlin said is “what we are trying to get away from.”

With the triumph of President Trump, many young immigrants are living in fear. During his political campaign, he mentioned the possible deportation of many undocumented immigrants and the possibility of repealing DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals).

DACA is a policy started by former President Barack Obama that allows undocumented immigrants who migrated to the US at a young age to work legally in the United States. Becoming a US citizen is not easy and requires years of waiting and a lot of money.

Although DACA is not a path to citizenship, it brings many other benefits like being allowed to obtain a driver’s license. However, many Americans know nothing about DACA and its importance.

An EHS student, Ashley Hemric, said (referring to DACA), “ No, I’ve never heard of it.” Many other US citizens may not be informed about the rights that Trump threatens to take from thousands of young undocumented students.

When asked about the naturalization process Hemric said she was “somewhat familiar” and acknowledged that becoming a citizen required taking a test with material “most Americans don’t know.” Unfortunately, those processes and legal standards are very important to many undocumented students who cannot remember living anywhere besides the U.S.

An undocumented Elkin High School student who prefers not to be identified, stated that if DACA were repealed, she would not be able to “continue her education after high school.” Trump’s plan would prevent her from having the education and quality of life she hoped to achieve. Her future, after all, is the reason why her parents risked so much to come to America, “It makes me mad that they [Trump and his supporters] do not understand the sacrifices that our parents have made to give us a better life.”

Like this EHS student, many Hispanic students all across America are anxious to see what President Trump’s next step is during his term. They are hoping that it is not the deportation of family members or the stripping of the rights DACA provides for them.

Erica Pineda, Cristina Nava, and Karla Romero are students at Elkin High School.

Tre Turner, EHS student, votes last fall in mock election.
http://www.elkintribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/web1_DACA.jpgTre Turner, EHS student, votes last fall in mock election. Cristina Nava | EHS

By Erica Pineda, Cristina Nava, and Karla Romero

For The Tribune

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