Last updated: July 03. 2014 10:21AM - 353 Views
By - tchilton@civitasmedia.com



Emma and Robert Fritchey, Jordan and Emma LeClair, and Emma Anderson show off their favorites at TNT Fireworks with names like, “The American Spirit,” “Chimes of Freedom,” “Independence Day” and “Lady Liberty.”
Emma and Robert Fritchey, Jordan and Emma LeClair, and Emma Anderson show off their favorites at TNT Fireworks with names like, “The American Spirit,” “Chimes of Freedom,” “Independence Day” and “Lady Liberty.”
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Fireworks thrill observers every Fourth of July all across the United States with their many colors, shapes, designs, sounds and peculiar meanings.


Proprietor Robert Fritchey operated a TNT Fireworks stand this year in Elkin that was open until midnight, July 3.


He said, “We love our great nation and celebrate our freedom. We live in the greatest nation on earth, and it is our privilege to help others celebrate the birth of our nation.”


For some Americans, fireworks bring with them a nostalgia, yet still inspire excitement as they did in childhood.


America has been commemorating its freedom with fireworks since the Presidency of John Adams.


In his article, “The Rockets’ Red, White, and Blue Glare,” Forrest Wickman explains a definitive reason fireworks became America’s Fourth of July pastime is because former President John Adams wanted it that way.


The article states Adams wrote in a letter to Abigail Adams on July 3, 1776, “the occasion should be commemorated with Pomp and Parade, with Shews, Games, Sports, Guns, Bells, Bonfires and Illuminations from one End of this Continent to the other from this Time forward forever more.”


According to Wickman, Philadelphia rang out a celebration of freedom in 1777 with the first commemorative Independence Day fireworks.


Americans remain connoisseurs in the field of fireworks and many still mark every occasion they can with their pomp.


Some fireworks displays can have the effect of bursting into hearts, or create stars formed in a ring-like style. Others resemble a waterfall as they burn a long time relatively speaking.


According to numerous websites, one of the most common fireworks used is the peony, which bursts in a spherical break of colored stars, without a tail effect. The chrysanthemum is another popular spherical shape with a crackling sound.


Some may fondly recall shooting the smaller Roman candles, with their fans and criss-crossing shapes of stars or bombettes or their presence in the larger displays on Independence Day on the South Carolina coasts, especially Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.


The time rain most likely will remain a favorite with its large, slow-burning stars that leave a path of glittering sparkles and make sizzling noises.


Today many remain excited or still perturbed by the loud hummers or high-pitched whistler types.


More information than ever can be found for those passionate about fireworks. Online, researchers will find numerous blogs and find buyers guides written to get the “most bang for the buck.”


Whatever the case, or occasion, young and old alike still find happiness, thankfulness and more variety than ever when celebrating American freedom.


As it is said, “Variety is the spice of life.”


Tanya Chilton may be reached at 336-835-1513 or on Twitter @TanyaTDC.


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